Artistic Regression

Recently my work has taken a focus on what could be described as ‘artistic regression’ – drawing inspiration from the naive artistic methods and media’s used in childhood. My prior idea of portraying memory lead to this exploration and has been softly inspired by the work of Mica Hendricks.
I am currently sticking to the form of tea bowls as I feel they encapsulate meditation due to the soothing and consuming nature of their utilization. I am currently in a very experimental stage, testing out methods of making. My experiments include:

  • Faux papier-mâché – Using paper and porcelain slip (in place of a glue solution) to mimic the process of papier-mâché. Upon firing, the paper should burn out, leaving behind the porcelain which should maintain the structure and texture of the process.
  • Bubble blowers – Adding oxides to bubble blowing solution and blowing bubbles to pop on a ceramic artefact. This process works well on paper when acrylic paint is added to the solution. My hope is that the use of oxides will achieve a more ‘mature’ aesthetic (due to their natural palette), whilst portraying a naive process, ultimately creating an interesting juxtaposition.
  • Finger painting – Crudely applying coloured slips with my hands. Potato stamps.

The idea of artistic regression will change the comment of my work from one of taking time for tranquillity to one of reconnecting with the inner child. When combined with imagery, this could be in an artistic way (Rekindling the ability to access unfettered imagination, like that of a child.) or it could be in a sociopolitical way (Portraying what I can only describe as positive nihilism – the idea that life is meaningless and we are insignificant but rather than seeing this in a negative light, embracing it as a motive to live as stress-free as possible. The mind of a child is a suiting subject to portray this notion as their mind is more consumed by instinct.)

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